CBD and THC edibles: legal or not?

For your calendar tomorrow:

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I live in weed city.  Within walking distance of my Greenwich Village apartment are at least ten outlets selling CBD and Delta-8-THC edibles—gummy candies, baked goods, drinks, treats for cats and dogs.

The nearest one opened in mid-November near the 8th Street subway stop to great fanfare.

It did not last long.  Late in the afternoon of December 28, I saw several police in the store supervising the removal of products to large garbage bags on the floor —a raid.  The next day, the store looked like this.

As it turns out, the raid was no coincidence.  The very next afternoon, Housing Works Cannabis, New York State’s first licensed recreational marijuana store, opened half a block away.

What a scene!  The lines to get into it circled the entire block.

Once things settle down and I can get into the store, I will report on its edible selection and prices.  Stay tuned.

In the meantime for your amusement, here’s what the FDA says about CBD edibles.

It is currently illegal to market CBD by adding it to a food or labeling it as a dietary supplement.

To the question, “Can THC or CBD products be sold as dietary supplements?” the FDA has a simple answer: “No.”

How’s that for food politics!

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